News / Species Spotlight / Species Spotlight - St. Patrick's Day Marine Livestock (03/16/17)

Species Spotlight - St. Patrick's Day Marine Livestock

Species Spotlight - St. Patrick's Day Marine Livestock
Everyone can be Irish on St. Patricks Day, so what better way to celebrate than decking your tanks out with green and gold! Show your spirit with some of these festive marine livestock.
Doesnt the Yellow Tang remind you of a gold coin? They will be the first thing you see in the aquarium. This Tang is a unique and hardy addition that has become famous because of its proclivity for eating hair algae (its preferred diet in the wild). Fish from this genus are generally quite active, so an aquarium with ample space to swim through and live rock would be ideal. They tend to be aggressive towards other fish that have a similar shape and color, but can be added as a school as long as they are all introduced at the same time. For best health, they should be fed dried seaweed twice a week or more and meaty or pellet foods at least twice a day.
The Green Mandarin is ready for the St. Patricks Day festivities. Provide an environment where there is a lot of space, hiding places, and where there is a lot of food items that grow naturally in an aquarium environment (copepods etc). Housing them in small aquariums will help keep the density of food higher than usual. Using live sand and rock can help achieve a healthy level of natural foods. We have very good luck keeping them in smaller aquariums and feeding them Nutramar Tigrio. Either way, these fish eat very slowly and will be out competed for food if kept in densely populated aquariums. It typically takes time and patience to get mandarins to eat frozen or pellet foods, so do not get discouraged if they do not take to those foods right away.
Yellow Polyps are the gold that will keep on multiplying (dont you wish all gold would do that). They are hardy, grow quickly and can live in just about every environment. Given supplemented feedings, they can thrive in very low light placements. When placed in moderate light scenarios, they can live without any direct feeding, but will still do better with some. Flow should be low to moderate and never direct. Cautionary notes are few with these animals, but hobbyists should take care not to place Yellow Polyps too close to other sessile invertebrates as the polyps can outgrow them.
You will have great luck with the Lemon Peel Angel. Since they are hardy, this angel is a great recommendation for the starter hobbyist. Its vibrant yellow coloration makes it stand out in just about any aquarium. To keep this angel happy, provide large amounts of live rock with some algal growth for hiding and grazing. The Lemon Peel Angel is not recommended for reef tanks because they tend to nip and graze on a variety of items, showing a preference for LPS Corals and clam mantles. Like any other dwarf angel, they can be aggressive with other small angels and similarly shaped/colored fish; because of this, we dont recommend keeping them in groups. The Lemon Peel Angels diet should be composed of a variety of items, including mysis, pellets or flake and some type of algae or sponge based food. Ideally, feed at least twice per day.
Green and clovers just scream St. Patricks Day and the Cultured Green Clove Coral represents both. They are a favorite among reef hobbyists due to ease of care and appearance. They are identified by their eight tentacle flowering polyps. When happy, this colonial coral grows very quickly and will spread throughout the aquarium. Take care not to place this coral too close to other sessile invertebrates as the polyps can overgrow many of them. Keep aggressive corals away from the Clove Coral because they can be damaged easily by sweeper tentacles. Given supplemental feedings, they can thrive in very low light placements. When placed in moderate light scenarios, they can live without any direct feeding. Regardless of lighting, they will benefit from direct foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates. Flow should be low to moderate and never direct.
Who doesnt want a little gold of St. Patricks Day? The Gold Nugget Maroon Clownfish is one of the hardiest clownfish that has awesome patterns, which will make it an anemone addition to the home aquariums. They are an extremely unique captive bred variant that is making its way into the aquarium trade. This aquacultured clown will host just about any anemone placed in the aquarium & even some different types of coral. In one of the neatest displays of symbiotic behavior that you can see in a home aquarium, the anemone provides food and a cleaning service for the anemone. Like most clownfish, this clown will become territorial and may bully anything that gets too close to its anemone. The Clownfishs diet should consist of mix meaty and pellet foods. More frequent feedings will increase the growth rate and encourage spawning in pairs!